Open Book | Board Of Review

Open Book | Board Of Review

Home » Taxes & Assessments » Open Book | Board Of Review
Open Book
Property owners have an opportunity once each year to ask that errors in their property assessments be corrected. What can you do?
Review the assessment of your property. Does it seem right? Compare it to the assessment of other nearby properties. Does any property you are familiar with seem disproportionately low or high as compared to your property?

Talk to the assessor. Negotiate with the assessor. You can talk to the assessor at any time, but during Open Book she is here in the Town Hall ready to talk to any Town of Cross Plains property owner. Her job is to get the assessments correct and explain them to property owners. Often just coming to Open Book to share information is sufficient to cause adjustments to assessments. The assessor can make changes to the assessment rolls up to the time of the beginning of the Board of Review. If the assessor remains convinced that your assessment is correct, ask her to explain the basis on which the assessment was made. This information will be valuable to you while preparing an appeal.


Board of Review
If you are unable to convince the assessor that your assessment is wrong, the next step is the Board of Review. Once each year, usually in early June, the town board sits as a quasi-judicial body known as the Board of Review. This is where a formal appeal concerning potentially erroneous assessments can be made. Notice of intent to file an appeal must be filed with the Town Clerk at least 48 hours before the Board of Review meets for the first time. Property owners must then provide sworn testimony supporting their case. State how much your property is worth and provide evidence to support your claim.

Useful information regarding the ways that valuation can be determined and how to prepare effective appeals can be found in materials referenced under General Information. Much of this material is directed toward those conducting the Board of Review, but it provides useful information on what the Board will consider and how they may view an appeal. Note that for residential property, recent sales of comparable properties is always the most important means of assigning value.

The assessor will be provided an opportunity to defend her assessment of the property. Both parties, property owner and assessor, will be allowed to rebut the others’ testimony. The Board of Review will decide what the correct assessment is based solely on the evidence presented to the Board.


 
Open Book
Property owners have an opportunity once each year to ask that errors in their property assessments be corrected. What can you do?
Review the assessment of your property. Does it seem right? Compare it to the assessment of other nearby properties. Does any property you are familiar with seem disproportionately low or high as compared to your property?

Talk to the assessor. Negotiate with the assessor. You can talk to the assessor at any time, but during Open Book she is here in the Town Hall ready to talk to any Town of Cross Plains property owner. Her job is to get the assessments correct and explain them to property owners. Often just coming to Open Book to share information is sufficient to cause adjustments to assessments. The assessor can make changes to the assessment rolls up to the time of the beginning of the Board of Review. If the assessor remains convinced that your assessment is correct, ask her to explain the basis on which the assessment was made. This information will be valuable to you while preparing an appeal.


Board of Review
If you are unable to convince the assessor that your assessment is wrong, the next step is the Board of Review. Once each year, usually in early June, the town board sits as a quasi-judicial body known as the Board of Review. This is where a formal appeal concerning potentially erroneous assessments can be made. Notice of intent to file an appeal must be filed with the Town Clerk at least 48 hours before the Board of Review meets for the first time. Property owners must then provide sworn testimony supporting their case. State how much your property is worth and provide evidence to support your claim.

Useful information regarding the ways that valuation can be determined and how to prepare effective appeals can be found in materials referenced under General Information. Much of this material is directed toward those conducting the Board of Review, but it provides useful information on what the Board will consider and how they may view an appeal. Note that for residential property, recent sales of comparable properties is always the most important means of assigning value.

The assessor will be provided an opportunity to defend her assessment of the property. Both parties, property owner and assessor, will be allowed to rebut the others’ testimony. The Board of Review will decide what the correct assessment is based solely on the evidence presented to the Board.